A message from Anonymous
Thank you for your response to my question about giving clients personal phone numbers. And to everyone who responded. It was very insightful.

Hey Anon,

That was a great question, thanks for asking. We’re happy to help. Let us know if you have any other questions!

-Twins

Understanding Racism in Multicultural Counseling: First Day

whenyoureanmft:

The professor’s like:

image

then I’m like:

image

then the professor responds with:

image

You feel like, “well I don’t hate black people, so I’m not racist,” but you benefit from racism. Just by merit, the color of your skin. The opportunities that you have, you’re privileged in ways that you might not even realize because you have been deprived of certain things. — Dave Chappelle

When my brother taught the Multicultural/diversity course, the first 5 minutes went EXACTLY like this haha.

A message from them00nman
At the moment I'm reading my psych textbook (it's online and free because my teacher is wonderful, it's on noba and a bunch of (like 120ish I think) professors around the country collaborated on it) and Gestalt just came up and I instantly thought of you guys. Just thought you'd like to know.

Hey them00nman,

Everything about this is cool! We really are humbled that for you, we accompany Gestalt; Especially since Fritz’s brilliant but dramatic ass is usually the first thing people think of haha.

Hope you have a good semester! 

-Twins

When clients ask how I’m doing after I’ve worked and went to class before their session, I’m just like: 

When clients ask how I’m doing after I’ve worked and went to class before their session, I’m just like: 

When I’m trying to read journal articles while walking on the treadmill, I’m just like:

When I’m trying to read journal articles while walking on the treadmill, I’m just like:

looking at my schedule for next semester, is just like:

looking at my schedule for next semester, is just like:

When classes require more then 1 textbook, I’m just like:

When classes require more then 1 textbook, I’m just like:

A message from Anonymous
Hi. I've been following your blog for a while and have been wanting to ask this question. What is your opinion on giving clients your personal phone number or a number in which they can contact you at any hour? I'm a social work student and this came up in a class. Some students said yes you should. I argued that it depended on the worker. As much as you want to give your client your best, you don't want to reach to the point where you're drained with no reprieve. What are your thoughts?

Hey Anon, thanks for putting up with us for as long as you have! This is a great question, which we think is a common talking point in most classes within the helping profession. 

Before answering this question, we took a look at the American Mental Health Counselor Association Code of Ethics (http://www.nymhca.org/AMHCACodeofEthics.pdfand the American Counseling Association  Code of Ethics (http://www.counseling.org/resources/aca-code-of-ethics.pdfand both documents do not give a clear YES or NO to giving clients a personal number or a number in which you can be reached outside of office hours. Although this may seem like useless information, it actually gives weight to your idea of it depending on the worker. 

In our opinion, we think it also depends on the helping professional. Every clinician is different, but personally, our clients can only contact us through an office number. Though we are extremely present with every client during their time with us, it would be exhausting to continue this level of presence beyond the time with which the client is PAYING for our services (because lets get real, we didn’t go to school for this long to not be payed for our expertise).

We wouldn’t want clients contacting us while we workout, sleep, eat, spend time with family and friends, watch an Arsenal Football Club match, while on a date, while in traffic, binge watching House of Cards on Netflix, on vacations, cutting grass, walking our dog, while watching American football or basketball, while in class or teaching a class, and any other times that contribute to making our life what it is outside of therapy.    

For us, it is a matter of boundaries. In an article written in Counseling Today by Lynne Shallcross, she mentions that maintaining boundaries is a crucial element of self-care. In the same article she cites Rankin as saying “A lack of professional boundaries can create feelings of being overwhelmed, bitter and angry. Too many counselors have not learned what boundaries are, so they meet with or take calls from clients outside of office hours, do not set office hours or work overtime when there is no real need. Basically, they put clients before their own family, friends and self.” http://ct.counseling.org/2011/01/taking-care-of-yourself-as-a-counselor/ 

We agree with Rankin, to an extent. For some clinicians, giving clients the ability to contact them at any hour may work perfectly with their life and the clients life. But because we try as much as possible to engulf ourselves in activities that do not relate to therapy, we can’t possibly promise to always pick up the phone when a client calls. And for us, it would be negligent to express to our clients that they can call us at any time without being able to assure them that we will always pick up. 

Thanks for the question! We would also like to open this up to our lovely followers who are also clinicians and clients - tell us your opinion on this…or not haha. 

- Twins

watching supervisee’s sessions, is just like:

watching supervisee’s sessions, is just like:

When the publishers sent me a free textbook for the class I’m teaching this semester, I was like:

When the publishers sent me a free textbook for the class I’m teaching this semester, I was like:

Before I start working on a huge assignment, I’m just like:

Before I start working on a huge assignment, I’m just like:

buying a new book bag for fall semester, is just like: 

buying a new book bag for fall semester, is just like: 

A message from Anonymous
i have been in a marrige for 30 years my husband got into a fight with one of my sons and he ended up arrested but now none of my kids talk to me because they say i should have left my husband . what should i do.

Hey Anon, 

Naww, we won’t take the responsibility of this decision away from you.

In our opinion, if we tell you what you should do and you do it; your life, your husband’s life, and the lives of your children could possibly change for generations and generations. All we have to base our decision on is:

1)You’ve been married for 30 years

2) Husband fought with son and got arrested

3) Kids won’t talk to you

Just 3 things!

In our opinion, seeking counseling wouldn’t be a bad idea. Find a therapist you feel comfortable explaining the details of your situation too. One who can adequately provide care without giving advice or taking the responsibility of the decision away from you.

Hope this helps,

-Twins

twintherapists:

When I tell my supervisor my rule outs for a diagnosis he’s just like: 

One of our very first posts - 2 yrs ago. Now we are the supervisors!

twintherapists:

When I tell my supervisor my rule outs for a diagnosis he’s just like: 

One of our very first posts - 2 yrs ago. Now we are the supervisors!

A message from Anonymous
What defines emotional abuse? what are some ways to escape it?

Hey Anon, thanks for the ask

We did some digging and found a couple articles that may interest you. We’ve also provided a link to the Journal of Emotional Abuse. Hopefully you have access to these articles:

Hope this helps,

-Twins